The Benefits of Taking Your Baby Swimming (From Bonding to Mental Health) – Guest post

Guest post from Jo Stone, who is a co-founder of Puddle Ducks: a franchise business that teaches independent swimming from birth in a nurturing environment with individually tailored activities.


One of the best-loved family activities, swimming is also one of the most widely participated sports in the UK. You may think there’s not much more to swimming than seeing your little one in a cute swimming costume, splashing around, and playing with all of the floats, but taking the plunge with your baby is a lot more beneficial than you may have first thought. Here are a few benefits to your baby making their first splash:

  1. Confidence is key

Introducing your baby to swimming from an early age can help to boost their water confidence (and their wider confidence), and in the long run it can prevent any future water-fear. It’s not uncommon for parents to pass on uneasiness of water and swimming to their children, because children are perceptive that way. By getting your baby used to water and swimming, they will bypass this fear, and it may even help you overcome your own fears (if you have them).

  1. Safety first

It’s normal for you to feel nervous about taking your little one to the pool, but there are so many positives. One of which is safety. You may not think it at first, but taking your baby swimming early on helps to build up their knowledge of water safety. Whether it’s teaching them to turn and reach for a wall/float/mum, or just learning the sensation of floating, it all adds up to showing them that the swimming pool is a safe and fun environment.

  1. Nothing beats family bonding

Swimming with your baby provides quality bonding time between both of you. We always have less time with our little ones than we would like, but swimming gives us that bonding time back. Being in the water with them is a great opportunity to give your undivided attention to them with lots of eye-to-eye communication, and have some water-based fun.

Skin-to-skin contact helps to strengthen the bond between you and your baby, and let’s not forget that it’s a great opportunity for the dads to spend some one-on-one time with the little ones to increase their bond together.

  1. Mental and physical health

Swimming is a superb way to incorporate exercise into your baby’s lifestyle from an early age. Swimming – unknowingly – is actually a full-body workout, because it encompasses physical activity from all of your baby’s muscles. Not only does it help with their physical health, but it also has a big impact on their mental health too. As swimming helps to strengthen your baby’s heart and lungs, it therefore encourages the development of the brain by stimulating all five senses of taste, touch, smell, sight, and sound. Plus, swimming helps to burn a few calories too, so be prepared for a workout yourself as well!

  1. Baby balance and coordination

A study by the Norwegian University of Science & Technology showed that babies who swim can grasp objects and have better balance than those who stay out of the pool. The main focus in the swimming pool is maintaining balance as your body is fully supported by water. So, your baby’s balance will inevitably improve, given that water-balance is their focal point when in the water.

  1. Strength and wellbeing

The buoyancy and water-resistance that babies experience during swimming means they use their muscles a lot more, and a lot more effectively. This all helps to build strength in your little one’s muscles and teach them about muscle control.

Now, we’re not saying swimming will get rid of your sleepless nights, but, swimming does help improve your baby’s sleeping pattern. The extra exercise will help to make your little one sleepier, which will maybe even give you a bit of a rest too. It’s not just the nighttime habits that will improve – it’s their appetites too. Exercise and the warm water of the pool can make a baby hungry, so make sure you have some snacks ready for after their last splash.

Committing to weekly swimming classes will help to add structure to both yours and your little one’s week. Providing them with a fun and social activity regularly definitely helps to improve their feeling of wellbeing.

  1. Enhance learning skills

There are many learning benefits swimming can have for your baby. The continued responding to voice-commands can help to increase their mental skills of understanding. In fact, a study at Griffith University found that those who swim from a young age are ahead of non-swimmers by 6 to 15 months when it comes to solving maths problems, developing language skills, counting ability, and the overall following of instructions.

Advancement in cognitive learning is also heavily increased due to swimming. If you think about the process of swimming, your baby will be learning multiple cross-pattern movements and exercises, which all increases neuron build-up in the brain. This facilitates skills such as communication, and overall will help to improve skills such as reading, spatial awareness, and academic learning.

  1. Social time

It’s always good to socialise, and we all love a bit of ‘us’ time with our friends, but guess what? So do your little ones. By going swimming, not only are you helping to improve their physical and cognitive development, but also allows them a head-start with their social skills.

We’re guessing you’re already packing the swim-bag and deciding which towel to take (we suggest the blue one), so have a look at where your local Puddle Ducks swim-team is, and get ready for you and your baby to make a splash!

Do’s and don’ts of exercising while pregnant

Guest post from Patricia Hogenes

Isn’t it an exciting time when you’re pregnant? While you are carrying, you want to think about exercise, because any fitness you build will help later on. For instance, doing bicep curls will be helpful when you are carrying the baby around the house. So what are the do’s and don’ts for pregnancy?

Do be moderate. If you exercised before the pregnancy, it is great to continue your workout routine, but just be moderate. If you used a weight workout regimen before pregnancy, it’s fine to continue that through the first trimester and even into the second. But by the third trimester, you’ll want to be cutting down on your use of weights. Here are some excellent resources with more information:

Do think of alternatives. If you were a runner before you were pregnant, but it’s now midsummer and really hot outside, maybe there is another way to get in a great aerobic routine, without facing the summer heat. Consider water aerobics. To replace the running, think about aqua walking. Just go to the community pool when the lap lanes are open and walk up and down the lap lanes. For more exertion, pick up the pace to aqua jogging. Do keep a water bottle at the end of the lane, to stay well hydrated.

Do use exercise for relaxation. With the stresses your body will be going through over the term of the pregnancy, exercise will function as a great relaxer. Your body sends out signals of calm and exuberance while you work out, and those will be transmitted to the baby, as well as making you relax more. You’ll be using that workout for double duty – keeping yourself peaceful, and helping grow a strong and happy baby.

Don’t overdo it. If you haven’t exercised much, and decide to start during pregnancy, it is perfectly fine to do that. A recommendation by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology is to engage in 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise per day, unless there is a complication. This is an excellent goal to strive for, but start by checking with your medical professional to make sure you’re cleared to begin exercise. Tell the doctor your plan, and make sure it will work for you. Begin with a low level of exercise, and gradually work up to higher levels over time. Don’t try to start with more than you can handle.

Don’t do really strenuous exercises. Be respectful of the changes your body is going through. Yes, it’s fine to exercise, but put some thought into the kinds of exercise which will be appropriate. For instance, there are some types of exercise that could put the belly at risk for trauma. Among those, off-road biking, horseback riding, gymnastics and downhill skiing are exercises that you might want to try later, after you’ve recovered from the pregnancy.

Don’t wait until later. With a lot of things happening in your world during the pregnancy, it would be easy to say “I do mean to work out, but I’ll just get started next week.” Putting things off is a common tendency, but during your pregnancy, time will be going fast, and it would be easy to quickly find yourself in the third trimester, not having worked out, and wishing you had. Start early, or if you’ve already been working out, don’t allow a break in your workout routine. You’ll be glad you did when it comes to the delivery, and after the child is born.

Smile when you think of your pregnancy, and how your exercise routine is making it a more powerful and positive experience.

Patricia Hogenes writes for AnApplePerDay.com, about kids, parenting, exercise and health. She is avid about her workouts, which have ranged from aqua jogging to marathon training to cycling. She and her husband also enjoy entertaining, and taking vacations with their kids.

Maria Kang “what’s your excuse?” photo, she’s got a good point!

Maria is all across the TV this morning with her controversial photo, which shows her with a flat tummy and amazing body with her 3 children. All credit to her this is very clever PR (probably carefully planned for maximum exposure) and has got her worldwide coverage!

She shouldn’t be getting so much criticism though, she is a hard working mum who has prioritised her fitness and her body, setting a great example to her kids.

From my own experience I know that you don’t have to sacrifice time with your children to exercise. If you are motivated you can fit it in around them. But it is hard work, which is why most women don’t bother. Don’t blame her for taking control and looking amazing!

I lost all my baby weight in 2 weeks with both of my daughters with sensible eating and exercise at home, following my exercise plan, the 3-plan. Make having a child the time you become a healthier, fitter, more confident woman and your whole family will benefit.

Here is my photo after 12 weeks after baby number 2 – my plan really does work!

12 weeks after baby